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U.S. Winter Outlook From The NOAA

Almanacs, amateurs, and just about anyone that messes around with meteorology has taken a swing at what the winter may look like for us here in the U.S. Now. the big dog when it comes to motoring and reporting weather here, the NOAA, has thrown their hat into the ring with yesterday's, October 15th, winter weather outlook. 

The short answer is that most of the winter party is going to be in the PNW, which has the highest chance of temperatures and precipitation being below and above normal, respectively. While there is a chance for a La Niña winter to affect the Northeast in a similar fashion, the NOAA outlook predicts that New England will have a greater chance of a warmer winter and break even on precipitation. 

While nobody likes bad news, and when it comes to snow sports enthusiasts, bad news about the coming winter is disliked even more. In this case, the bad news comes in the form of less precipitation and warmer temperatures across the southern part of the country, which could lead to even more drought conditions, including some current droughts getting worse, mostly in the southwest.

It should be noted that we are still a bit of a way out from the winter and this is just an outlook. Forecasts going forward could be very different the closer we get to winter, as the weather could change at any time. However, for the time being, perhaps, it seems that winter could be pretty mild again this season. If you would like to see the whole outlook, which includes more specific region information, as well as maps of precipitation, drought, and temperatures, please head to the NOAA website featuring the outlook, which is linked below.

U.S. Winter Outlook: Cooler North, warmer South with ongoing La Nina

NOAA's winter forecast for the U.S. favors warmer, drier conditions across the southern tier of the U.S., and cooler, wetter conditions in the North, thanks in part to an ongoing La Nina. Forecasters at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center - a division of the National Weather Service - are also closely monitoring persistent drought during the winter months ahead, with more than 45% of the continental U.S.

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